Revulytics Blog

Pick Your Battles - Fighting the Right License Compliance Fights

March 26, 2012

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Battle of Bosworth 1485One of the best lessons you learn as a parent is to “pick your battles.” You only have so much energy and (emotional) capital to spend so it is important to make sure the battle is on a significant issue and that the outcome will yield positive (hopefully long term) results. Do I care that my son’s hair looks like a bird’s nest (a gut reaction I have)? Sure, but it is more important to make sure his homework is completed before moving on to other activities (a more measured response to make sure he is prepared with an eye on both the short and long term).

The same is true in the world of license compliance and software piracy. You only have so many resources to address these issues and it can be hard picking the right battles to fight. Do you focus on software protection or software intelligence? Do you focus on infringers where settlements are harder or easier?

Software Protection vs. Software Intelligence

We believe there must be a balance in the deployment of software protection, license enforcement, compliance programs, and software intelligence. Many software vendors invest in licensing and add software protection when they realize their applications are being cracked and made available through vast and decentralized piracy distribution channels. It is often an emotional response that ignores challenges with software protection:

  • Significant cost of ownership: applying software protection is not a one-time operation. Software vendors need to dedicate internal resources to become software protection experts and continually jitter or modify the protection to stay ahead of the cracker community.
  • Protection ceiling: although protection can be increased by adding “more” protection, software vendors discover there is a limit to adding more protection features to respond to new threats without negatively impacting application performance and customer usability.

On the other hand, Software Intelligence enables software vendors to respond to these issues by making data-driven decisions based on the information they collect. They have better insight into where their vulnerabilities lie, but also the license revenue opportunity that exists by pursuing the infringers of their software.

Picking the Right Battles by Identifying the Best Targets

Collecting software intelligence is a critical component, but you also need to be able to organize, analyze and prioritize your data so you can identify the best opportunities for a successful outcome. We recently announced CodeArmor Intelligence 3.4 and the enhanced reporting available within our Compliance Dashboard. For example, we added new functionality to our compliance dashboard to clearly display the precise number of unique machines alongside a complete history of software use. This allows investigators to visually filter and pinpoint the most active machines within a target organization environment. Armed with this insight into the data, a software vendor’s compliance team (or compliance partner) can begin recovering license revenue and adding new customers.

Enlisting Help in the Battle

If you are going to be in the Boston area on May 1, please join us for a License Compliance Panel Discussion and Reception at the Westin Waltham.

  • Enlist help from experts from Dassault Systèmes, Sullivan & Worcester and Software Compliance Group and learn best practices for generating, investigating and converting license compliance opportunities from existing customers and new prospects.
  • Join us for drinks and hors d'oeuvres afterward and talk with your peers at other software vendors and find out how they pick their battles.

Activate Your Data-Driven Compliance Program

Add new license revenue by detecting, identifying and converting unpaid users into paying customers.

Michael Goff

Post written by Michael Goff

Marketing Director at Revulytics
Michael is Marketing Director at Revulytics where he is responsible for corporate marketing, content, and social media. He has helped to educate the industry on the benefits of software usage analytics for compliance and product management through the company's blog and contributed articles in trade publications. Michael was previously a marketing programs manager at The MathWorks and principal at Goff Communications. Michael earned a J.D. from Boston University School of Law and a B.A. from Colgate University.